By The Restaurant Dieter

Tag: Fast food

Lent and the temptation of fried fish

NOTE; Sorry some of the photos are sideways. My technical adviser is looking into why this keeps happening when I file posts from my phone.

Lent began yesterday. For the faithful, it’s 40 days of sacrifice and denial leading to the renewal of Easter.

As a kid, it meant a half-hearted and little-enforced effort to give up some little pleasure — a favorite candy maybe. It also meant fish on Friday, which everyone hated. In the Midwest, the fish was rarely fresh, and then there was my sister’s terror of death by undiscovered fish bone. (It remains with me even today; thanks sis.)

But the Lord provided. In 1965, McDonald’s went national with its first non-hamburger sandwich: the deep-fried Fillet-o-Fish.

Now there was religion I could get behind. As my husband says, “I’d eat a sweat sock if you deep fried it.”

Not being religious these days, I typically realize it’s Lent when the fish sandwich promotional billboards go up at fast food menu counters. That’s what happened Thursday at Wendy’s.

And right away, I could feel my tastebuds hankering for this:

Wendy’s fish sandwich

But something intervened and I ordered this:

Wendy’s Apple Pecan Chicken Salad

God or willpower? You decide.

Salads aside, fast food is getting worse, not better for you

Forget all that stuff about the fruit cup or the salad that landed on the menu. It masks a 30-year trend of fast food meals overall getting worse, not better. They’ve gotten more bigger, more fattening and saltier.

That’s the conclusion of research published recently by Boston and Tufts universities in The Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The study looked at 30 years of fast food menus at restaurants such as McDonald’s, Dairy Queen and KFC.

Between 1986 and 2016, deserts grew by 62 calories per decade; entrees gained 30 calories per decade; and sodium grew as well each decade — 4.6 percent for entrees, 3.9 percent for sides and 1.2 percent for deserts.

With about 37 percent of U.S. adults consuming some fast food every single day, according to the National Center for Health Statistics, it’s not what you’d call good news. Fast food has been implicated in rising rates of obesity, diabetes and heart disease.