Later on, there will be some nitpicking about the menu. But let’s just start with the most important thing: Thanks to the in-theater dining trend, finally there is something besides movie popcorn, candy and liquid-cheese nachos to eat at the theater. For someone trying to eat healthy, it’s an improvement.

The Wall Street Journal pegged the trend to trouble in the movie industry overall. Adding food was hoped to bring back adults, who have found the movies themselves lacking, it said.

Earlier this week, we caught the 3D “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” at The AMC Dine-In Theaters Bulkhead 6. Last night, we wound up at CineBistro at Town Brookhaven for “The Big Short.” (Note: The latter theater says kids under 21 are not allowed at shows after 6 p.m. and before that only if accompanied by an adult.)

Both have menus that seem right off the Sysco truck, but that’s to be expected. They just need to have enough choices to satisfy most people without a lot of food waste or the need for high-end chefs to cook it.

At the AMC Bulkhead 6, the menu actually had the calorie counts for each dish. OK, so calories alone don’t tell you much about the healthfulness of food, but at least it’s something.

I had the grilled chicken quinoa, which clocked in at 720 calories. It was probably a cup-and-a-half of quinoa (9 points on the new Weight Watchers system), 3 ounces of grilled chicken (2 points), a quarter-cup slivered almonds (5 points), a quarter cup of feta cheese (4 points) and 3-4 tablespoons dressing (4-6 points). The asparagus and tomato amounted to 0 points, although one suspects there was some oil used in the roasting of the asparagus.

"Crispy" brussels sprouts

“Crispy” brussels sprouts

All in all, it was a pretty expensive entree, points-wise. It was small enough that I found myself ordering the crispy brussels sprouts, which were listed at 230 calories. The 1 1/2 cups of brussels sprouts themselves would have been about 57 calories, so the rest of the calories came from being stuck in a deep fryer.

Adding that was a mistake. As it was when I ordered it last night again at CineBistro. They are a favorite vegetable, but this whole trend of throwing them in a deep fryer doesn’t do them any favors.

CineBistro’s menu is more varied and has greater ambitions: Moroccan lamb chop and fig-and-brie flatbread, for instance. That’s not necessarily a good thing. The Restaurant Dieter’s spouse has a rule of thumb: If you suspect that the kitchen’s ambitions exceed the likely skill, order the hamburger.

He did just that, and I ordered the grilled chicken BLT, no B with a Caesar salad on the side instead of the fries. I left the bun and ate only the chicken and the Swiss cheese and smear of guacamole that came on it. The salad was pretty lightly dressed, so I ate that too, leaving aside the huge, fried cracker of parmesan that came on top.

With the unfortunate crispy sprouts, neither meal was exactly a nutritional or diet winner. On the other hand, it beats a  nutritionally vapid tub of “buttered” movie popcorn and giant package of Twizlers.